By Tyler Trott, Murali Dharan, Sitaram Kalluri

Context: The @protocol supports end-to-end encryption for all the data handled through it. This is difficult to do, especially for information that is shared with a large number of people and very frequently, so we had to come up with a clever mechanism to make the technology work. In this document, we will discuss the details behind how we went about accomplishing data encryption on the @protocol.

Black background with vertical lines of glowing green symbols, presumably code.
Black background with vertical lines of glowing green symbols, presumably code.
Source: Unsplash

End-to-End Encryption on the @protocol

Combinations of both Asymmetric Key Encryption and Symmetric Key Encryption is a common practice for information security. Asymmetric Key Encryption is used to exchange keys (commonly both private and public keys) and can be used to encrypt communication. To effectively and properly encrypt the public and private keys a strong algorithm with a large bit key (described later) should be utilized. Once a key exchange is performed (typically after having done an Asymmetric Key Encryption method), another encryption algorithm that is faster and uses a smaller key is then implemented. This could be another Asymmetric Key Encryption algorithm or even a Symmetric Key Encryption algorithm. Asymmetric Key Encryption can be used with Symmetric Key Encryption to protect a generated public key. …


In a Post-Insurrectionist Pandemic, does the customer need software, two-day shipping, or followers? Maybe. Or perhaps they need humanity most.

Written by Jory Des Jardins, CMO at The @ Company.

Black and white person sitting at computer with colorful streams bursting out of it
Black and white person sitting at computer with colorful streams bursting out of it
Illustration by Clark William Miller

Thanks to Clark Miller for the rather brilliant illustration, rendered with not a whole lot of direction other than: Make it about the Internet, and make it optimistic….

Ten years ago, I became a fan of the sci-fi TV show Fringe.


By Muralidharan Padmanaban & Anthony Prakash

Whether you’re a developer looking to get started on the @protocol, an enterprise technologist trying to get a deeper understanding, or a casual Internet reader who randomly stumbled upon us, you’ve come to the right place. This article will give you a basic understanding of how our technology works. So let’s get started.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Florian Olivo on Unsplash

What is the @protocol?

Developed by The @ Company, the @protocol is an Open-source, P2P Internet protocol that enables developers and enterprises to handle personal data based on trust and permissions.

On the @protocol, people will have the freedom to share, withhold, or retract their information at will through a unique identifier we’ve titled the @sign. …


A closer look at the three winners of our FlutterVikings contest

Image for post
Image for post
Source: Giphy

This past November, we had the honor of participating in the world’s largest Nordic Flutter conference, FlutterVikings. At the conference, we presented attendees with a challenge: develop a simple mobile application on the @protocol in just three days.

In spite of the contest’s tight deadline, we were overwhelmingly impressed by the submissions we received, and ultimately awarded three very deserving winners €500 each. Read more about the winners and their respective apps below.

Att@ched


We’re creating an Alternative Internet that puts people first

Image for post
Image for post
Source: Giphy

Happy New Year! As we say good riddance to the dumpster fire that was 2020, we’re hoping that 2021 will be a year of recovery and growth.

Amidst a flurry of antitrust charges filed against big tech and growing debate on how to regulate online privacy, we at The @ Company are doing our part to keep the focus where it should be: treating people like people. We’ve come up with several 2021 resolutions that will help us make this a reality.

Ask for permission.

No more excuses — this one’s really quite simple. People are more than just browsing habits or bits of data; they are living, breathing beings with the inherent right to choose. Before we access someone’s data or track their activity on our website, we’ll ask for permission. …


An interview with The @ Company’s lead architect Jagannadh Vanguri

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

These are the words of Leonardo Da Vinci, who is widely considered one of the most diversely talented individuals ever to have lived. Centuries later, these words continue to resonate with us every day, especially in the world of technology and software engineering. Simplicity is often forgotten while trying to solve business problems with software and code, resulting in high costs and frustration for developers.

Image for post
Image for post

Meet Jagannadh Vanguri, an avid badminton enthusiast, travel buff and prolific reader who also works with The @ Company as the lead architect of the @protocol. …


Forget the Crystal Ball. Here is what I’d like to see happen in Business, Tech, and Life in 2021.

Written by Jory Des Jardins, CMO at The @ Company.

I am hardly a business Nostradamus — If I was I wouldn’t have sold my remaining crypto this fall — but I did notice things. And I spotted trends, albeit in a rather self-serving way. I call out what interests me, and what I’d like to see more of in the world. You could say I’m not so much a trendspotter as a trendinsinuist.

So then, here are my trendsinuations for 2021:

1.Virtual Rehab, and Offlining.

With school, work, and life all occurring at home for the past 10 months, my house has become a digital crack den, with devices strewn about, some left in the bathroom or wedged in between couch cushions. With fewer IRL social outlets this year, my kids have turned to platforms such as Roblox, Discord, Netflix, Dad’s old and completely inappropriate Playstation games involving disembowelment and patricide, and the App Store. …


@talks: Solutions to the Social Dilemma — A virtual discussion series

How many extremely knowledgeable and relentlessly creative Internet experts does it take to unscrew a lightbulb?

If that lightbulb is the Internet’s problems — quite a lot.

Three individuals in a brainstorming session plot ideas on a whiteboard.
Three individuals in a brainstorming session plot ideas on a whiteboard.

On December 3rd, we invited three notable figures in the data privacy landscape to join us for a fascinating, even inspiring, discussion about the future of the Internet. Among these were:


What happens when someone Googles your name?

If you’re one of the lucky ones, your secret admirers might be directed to your LinkedIn, with your most recent headshot and non-embarrassing professional posts.

If you’re one of the unlucky ones… well, let’s just say that there are things in the past that should remain in the past.

Image for post
Image for post

We’ve been conditioned to accept this lack of control over our digital footprint after years on the Internet. If we want to partake in online discourse, we have no choice but to sign away our right to privacy (which includes being Google-searchable). …


Written by Esther Kao

Image for post
Image for post
Source: Know Your Meme

If you’ve spent any time on the Internet, you’ve probably encountered something like this:

About

The @ Company

Now for some internet optimism

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store